The Alice Springs Telegraph Station reverted to the late 1880s in one day

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The clock was turned back by 17 Alice Springs School of the Air students as part of Get Together Week.

Principal Kerrie Russell said the week was an opportunity to bring together far-flung students who hadn’t physically met since March.

“During the overnight camp, Year 3/4 students donned period costumes to resurrect 19th Century life at the repeater station,” she said.

“The junior students delved into Telegraph Station history, and were taught in the classroom used by the children of postmaster Thomas Andrew Bradshaw.

“They prepared meals in the kitchen once dominated by cook, Cookie Lloyd, role played the duties of Runge — an Arrernte woman and domestic worker — and sent Morse code messages.

“This living history camp was an engaging way for students to learn about the importance of the Telegraph Station in the development of Alice Springs.”

Murray Downs Station student Billy James was fascinated by Telegraph Station technology.

“It was really interesting to learn how to send messages in Morse code,” he said.

Ms Russell said 20 senior students made stopovers to learn about ancient landforms and traditions.

“The years’ 5 to 9 students camped under the stars in an exploration of the geological wonders of Central Australia, and Aboriginal traditions at the Lilla community,” she said.

“The activities included sand drawings, dot painting, learning about traditional tools and stories.

“And our preschool to Year 2 students learned road safety principles at the Newland Park Road Safety Centre, and observed plants and animals at the Alice Springs Desert Park.”

Alice Springs Telegraph Station
During the overnight camp, Year 3/4 students donned period costumes to resurrect 19th Century life at the repeater station.

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