Rubbish to be profitably rerouted

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An extraordinary number of Bakewell Primary School students will begin recycling or composting onsite rubbish from 16 November.

About 950 students will join the reuse trial, following the waste audit of the school by Year 3/4 students.

Identifying trash types and reprocessing options is an extension of environmental science studies.

Environmental science teacher Kristin Cowan said about 450 students are learning about waste management this semester.

“Rubbish was collected from bins in five classrooms after recess and lunch,” she said. “It was sorted into poppers, soft plastic, recyclables, uneaten food, compost and landfill.

“The students identified composting, 10 cent recycling, mixed recycling, and recycling as ways to reclaim many discarded items.

“Fruit and vegetable scraps become compost, poppers, cans and plastic drink bottles are 10 cent recyclables, mixed recycling favours metal, cardboard, paper, plastic and glass, and recycling processes soft plastics.”

Ms Cowan said the students were surprised by the amount of unused food, and the volume of waste going to landfills.

“The students learned about resource choices, and the potential to regenerate rubbish to serve new purposes,” she said.

The trial will continue until the end of the year.

Bakewell Primary School students will begin recycling or composting onsite rubbish from 16 November
Bakewell Primary School students will begin recycling or composting onsite rubbish from 16 November.

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