Litter not a legacy

Published

The ethos of sustainability at Giraween Primary School is finding expression in a Keep Australia Beautiful contest.

The 2020 Young Reporters for the Environment Litter Less challenge is drawing entries from 11 to 25-year-old students.

After choosing a litter-related topic, participants are expected to make a project report, plan a media campaign, and organise a community action day.

The school targeted illegally dumped waste on neighbouring vacant land.

The rubbish includes tyres, concrete, metal, plastic bottles, toys, broken glass bottles, and numerous animal bones — including horse skulls.

The report is two short videos addressing the impact of dumping on local wildlife and the immediate water table.

The school has attempted a clean-up, but the enormity of the task means community involvement is needed.

The students want to publicise the problem, promote reuse and recycling, minimise unlawful dumping, and improve the environment for local wildlife.

The winners of the national competition will be announced in November.

Litter not a legacy
Dump site is peppered with old bones.

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