Fine art printmakers turn a dollar

Published

A group of business trainees are turning lino cutting and printing into a successful enterprise.

The 15 novice capitalists are years 9 and 10 students at Gunbalanya School.

The entrepreneurs were spurred to begin the venture after months of research.

Secondary teacher Amanda Marshall said development of the embryonic industry was spurred by the school’s Employment Pathways program.

“Using lessons from the program, and extensive investigation, the students developed an art business based on just a few steps,” she said.

“The children create designs by manually cutting away some parts of the lino sheet, while leaving other areas untouched.

“Black ink is rolled onto this printing plate. When it is hand pressed on paper the cut out areas appear white, and the uncut areas appear black.

“The designs have been inspired by old Gunbalanya stories, rock art, and students’ daily lives.

“The community attended the students’ first classroom shop, where the lino prints were sold for $10 each. Most of this money has been used to buy bags and t-shirts to print on.”

Each print is accompanied by a narrative on its subject, and a photograph of its creator. The industrialists plan to market their products in Darwin, and online.

The Employment Pathways program aims to boost skills valued in the workplace, including enhanced numeracy and literacy, teamwork, and the ability to accept fresh challenges and master new techniques.

Fine art printmakers turn a dollar
The children create designs by manually cutting away some parts of the lino sheet, while leaving other areas untouched.

Share this page: